Projects

Iti te Kōpara – Hapū Economic Development Plan

Iti te kopara kai takiri ana i runga i te Kahikatea.

Hikurangi Takiwa Trust (HTT) with support from Eastland Community Trust (ECT), commissioned the preparation of a draft Economic Development Plan to help identify opportunities and plan action to raise the economic wellbeing of the Takiwa.

Scope

HTT Trustees agreed at their meeting in March 2016 that it made sense for the plan to include people and places in the wider district and not be restricted just to the geographic and population communities that Hikurangi Takiwa Trust is established to benefit. This plan has a focus on the area generally from Te Puia Springs and Waipiro Bay through to Poroporo and Rangitukia.

It is by no means comprehensive or authoritative, it has no explicit mandate from the people in this district but we have tried to involve business owners and local residents in identifying priorities and opportunities to progress. We have provided drafts of the plan to a number of external stakeholders with a particular interest in our communities.

Structure

Through a process of local stakeholder engagement and research, a broad range of opportunities have been narrowed down in the development of an Action Plan to ensure limited resources can make the greatest short to medium term difference.

The projects in the Action Plan have been organised together into three broad work streams:

  • WHAIRAWA / CAPITAL GROWTH
  • AHUWHENUA / ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT
  • KUHUKUHU / SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOODS

 

The Whairawa / Capital Growth work-stream focuses on identifying and growing six asset classes in the district:

  • Natural Capital: Regenerating a healthy natural environment.
  • Manufactured Capital: Ensuring the infrastructure that enables economic development and wellbeing is available.
  • Human Capital: Building local capability for economic development through education, training, mentoring and whānau relocating back to the district.
  • Intellectual Capital: Developing and protecting knowledge-based assets including traditional knowledge and intellectual property.
  • Financial Capital: Encouraging capital investment in local ventures.
  • Social & Cultural Capital: Maintaining and growing healthy relationships, traditions, creativity and resources within the community.

The Ahuwhenua / Enterprise Development work-stream focuses on supporting the local development of high value industries and the business service sector. This includes new products and services and expanding existing enterprises while reducing associated business costs:

  • Tourism & Hospitality: eco-tourism, cultural experiences, agricultural tourism, etc.
  • Bioactives: manuka, kanuka, hemp, pine, etc.
  • Energy: solar, hydro and biomass for heating, fuel and electricity
  • Research & Technology: online businesses and services, consultants and technical support, etc.
  • Forestry: diversifying species, improving environmental management, utilising waste stream, etc.
  • Beef & Sheep: diversifying breeds and improving production
  • Horticulture: cropping, nuts, truffles, saffron, Nati Kai Kete, etc.

The Kuhukuhu / Sustainable Livelihoods work-stream focuses on supporting whānau to stay in the district, maintain sustainable lifestyles based on traditional whenua and access to natural resources through:

  • Supporting Existing Businesses: identifying & deploying priority business support for existing enterprise;
  • Reframing Development: using progress indicators that measure wellbeing instead of income;
  • Supporting Subsistence: enabling public policy supporting rather than penalising subsistence lifestyles based on hunting, gathering and harvesting;
  • Digital Development: improving digital infrastructure and skills for telecommuting.

Next Steps

To progress the goals of the plan Hikurangi Takiwa Trust supports the establishment of a new entity to lead job creation and economic development opportunities in the takiwa and neighbouring hapū. Subsequently this planning process has resulted in the establishment of Hikurangi Huataukina Trust, a charitable trust focused on job creation and economic development – initially in the communities between Waipiro Bay and Rangitukia.

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Vision Matauranga support for hapū

New funds have been allocated to support the co-management of freshwater in Tairawhiti. Hapū collective, Hikurangi Takiwā Trust, will host a two year placement of freshwater scientist, Dr Joanne Clapcott, from the Cawthron Institute, New Zealand’s largest independent science organisation.

The placement will be funded by the Te Punaha Hihiko – Vision Matauranga Capability Fund from the Ministry for Business Innovation & Employment. This is the fourth round for the Fund which was established to grow skills and capacity for Māori participation in science and innovation and support outcomes that benefit New Zealand.

The placement will help discover and develop local capability through the design and application of a cultural monitoring framework for freshwater resources.

“The cultural monitoring framework provides the backbone of the placement from which we hope to develop new tools for local hapū and landowners to engage in freshwater management” says Dr Clapcott.

Proposed new ‘tools’ include:

  • a locally relevant cultural health indicator
  • a monitoring network that identifies and incorporates the values of local hapū
  • a five year regional engagement plan that promotes co-learning amongst neighbouring hapū collectives with parallel aspirations to increase their freshwater management capability.

Hikurangi Takiwā Trust has strong kaitiakitanga aspirations and a desire to engage in the co-management of freshwater in the Waiapu rohe. Following the ratification of the Joint Management Agreement between Te Runanga o Ngāti Porou and Gisborne District Council in 2015, Hikurangi Takiwā Trust have been identifying ways to actively engage in the co-management of environmental resources in the Waiapu catchment.

“Hikurangi Takiwā Trust are stoked to host and work alongside Dr Joanne Clapcott – who has affiliations to local hapū Te Aitanga a Mate – in her placement and build our freshwater skill set” says Trustee Pia Pohatu.

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Meanwhile, Hikurangi Takiwā Trust has teamed up with He Awa Ora, He Tai Ora, Healthy Rivers Living Sea Education Trust to offer a two day training workshop this week on stream and river quality monitoring.

The workshop for hapū members, marae representatives, local landowners, teachers and students is on 27th and 28th June at Kariaka Pa, Ruatoria.

For more information and to register please contact Pia Pohatu: pia@uritukuiho.org.nz

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Hikurangi Takiwa Trust is a hapū collective progressing the interests and responsibilities of Te Aitanga-a-Mate, Te Aowera, Te Whānau-a-Rākairoa, Te Whānau-a-Hinekehu and Te Awemapara hapū located between Waipiro Bay and Ruatorea.

Tieki Te Taiao Wānanga #4 Programme

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Due a number of factors beyond our control (like lambing and bereavements) some last minute changes to the wānanga programme – and this is still subject to weather and a range of other factors – but it’s still looking awesome!

Organisers reserve the right to change the programme whenever we feel like it...

Organisers reserve the right to change the programme whenever we feel like it…

Tieki Te Takiwa : Wananga 14-16 Akuhata

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The fourth hapu conservation wananga will be held in August, hosted by Penu and Rongohaere.
Starting Friday 14th August at Penu Pa (6434 Waipau Rd, SH35), the wananga will include field trips to a number of significant cultural and ecological sites around the takiwa between Waingakia and Ihungia.11017188_10153098707531273_1603213809431869959_n

Freshwater scientists Murray Palmer and Ian Ruru will be working with tamariki and whanau to monitor the health of the Mata, Makatote and Makarika awa, we’ll have some korero on the whakapapa of both Rongohaere and Penu (Rongo-i-te-Kai) marae, an overview of some of the critical environmental issues in this part of the takiwa including the impacts of farming and forestry and we’ll be visiting some of the most spectacular examples of pristine ngahere in the rohe – as well as some awesome vistas over the takiwa from the top of Matahia Station.
The weekend is free, koha of healthy kai welcome.

A full programme will be available next week. Contact Pia Pohatu (pia[at]uritukuiho.org.nz) for more information.

Naumai haramai!

Note: If the weather makes these trips dangerous we will postpone until the following weekend.

Digital mapping wānanga builds hapū knowledge and skills

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Creating interactive maps of ecological and cultural significance was a key highlight for over 60 participants in a three day digital mapping wananga at Hiruharama Pa near Ruatorea this week.

Utilising Google Earth and other Geographic Information Systems (GIS) platforms and apps, local whanau, rangatahi and staff members of Te Papa Atawhai and the Gisborne District Council visited sites in the area to geo-tag places of significance. A wide range of data and information was collated virtually and in situ including photographs, traditional placenames, historical korero, mahinga kai, water quality and freshwater habitat information, native vegetation, pests/weeds and recreational use.FullSizeRender

Duane Wilkins, Mapping Manager of Te Papa Atawhai – Department of Conservation in Wellington was the lead keynote presenter and facilitator for the mapping workshop. Biologist Dr Ian Ruru led sessions focused on the tuna as a sentinel species to support water quality monitoring and the assessment of freshwater habitat. Takerei Norton and Iain Gower skyped in to the wananga to share Ngai Tahu’s impressive digital mapping project that has already geo-tagged over 5,000 traditional placenames in Te Waipounamu. Local DOC ranger, Graeme Atkins shared his extensive knowledge of native plants and wetland restoration advice as part of the hikoi on Kahuitara.

“GIS is a powerful and accessible tool for recording and re-presenting matauranga and information that is important to us, supports lifelong learning and our aspirations, needs and responsibilities as kaitiaki” said Pia Pohatu, wananga organiser and project leader of Tieki Te Taiao O Te Takiwa – a three year conservation project for Hikurangi Takiwa Trust. “The ability to collectively build and share maps will support the transmission of matauranga between generations, improve our decision-making and better inform the initiatives we want to lead and get involved with.”FullSizeRender

Newly appointed East Coast Area Officer for Gisborne District Council Ngarangi Walker also helped organise the wananga after participating in a Google Earth Indigenous Mapping hui in Whakatane last year.

“It is important for organisations like the Council to understand how hapu and local communities want to be involved as decision-makers and the collective approaches required to ensure they are ably represented in RMA and local government processes. Hapu or community created maps are an effective way to portray the values they associate with place/s and inform Council processes to respond appropriately.” said Miss Walker.

Digital forms to record details about significant sites were developed during the wananga along with a plan to digitally map the hapu tribal estate over the next three years. Archives of historical value such as survey maps and opportunities to gain further training in GIS were also made available to wananga participants. With half the wananga attendees being under the age of 18 and the oldest aged 84 – the technology, science and matauranga themes provided something for all to learn and contribute toFullSizeRender.

Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou board member and NZ Trade and Enterprise advisor Barry Soutar talked about a number of Maori businesses commercialising GIS systems and using digital technologies in global markets to earn millions for the product developers, company owners and the country.

The wananga was supported through koha from wananga participants and the Department of Conservation Community Conservation Partnership Fund.

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Hapu restoration project already having positive impact

A conservation project by hapu on the East Coast is generating interest and momentum amongst local whanau, hapu, marae and kura.

Tieki Te Taiao is a three year project to identify and protect sites of ecological and cultural significance between Whareponga and Hikurangi Maunga. Supported by the Department of Conservation, the first year of the project is focused on assessing our natural resources and planning for restoration of key sites in the years to come.

At the first of six wananga held last weekend at Whareponga, environmental scientists Lois Easton (Gisborne District Council) and Murray Palmer (Nga Mahi Te Taiao Ltd) provided hapu members with training on wetland plant and weed identification and water quality monitoring.

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Left to right: Hapu members Sara Ngarimu, Kapa Keelan, Maria Wynyard, Claude Walker, Tarsh Koia, Angela Tibble, Pia Pohatu and scientist Murray Palmer.

“Wananga are awesome learning opportunities. It is always great to visit our places of significance, reconnect as whanau and share learnings with invited experts. Our rangatahi – so kamakama with their technological savvy – played an important part in recording our discoveries and results. It is a bonus that our whanau are moved to start protection works ‘instantaneously’ on-site.” said Pia Pohatu, Project Manager for Hikurangi Takiwa Trust.

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Collecting water samples in Hikuku wetland 

As a result of the information shared, whanau and hapu members started removing the South American Swamp Flower that was found at the wetland visited. Hikuku and the other four wetlands on the Waikohu block are important to us historically and culturally and they also provide important fresh water habitat. Ms Pohatu said “following the erection of stockproof fencing hapu members are planning regular camps to continue eeling practices, remove weeds, monitor water quality and replant areas with suitable native plant species”.

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Clearing South American Swamp Flower

The Trust is developing a comprehensive assessment of the health of the land, water and biodiversity that will form a ‘State of the Rohe’ environmental report by the end of this year.

Local residents and landowners in the area have been invited to participate in the project. Support available for landowners includes training and resources that support sustainable land and water management. Volunteers helping with habitat restoration through site and resource specific plans, seed collection, propagation and replanting of sites and some financial support for conservation activities are also available.

“By landowners identifying sites of significance or determining what sustainable land and water management means to them we are able to support their needs and aspirations in a variety of ways including accessing technical and scientific expertise that will enable us to restore habitats” said Ms Pohatu.

“Over the year we are working through our whole rohe (tribal area), to identify and prioritise sites and habitats that are important to the hapu and need protection.”

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Looking out from Kokai over Whareponga to Kaimoho

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For more information landowners can contact Pia Pohatu at pmcpohatu@gmail.com, telephone 06 8648667 or 021 653341 and via www.hikurangi.wordpress.com

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Left to right: Hapu members Sara Ngarimu, Kapa Keelan, Maria Wynyard, Claude Walker, Tarsh Koia, Angela Tibble, Pia Pohatu and scientist Murray Palmer.

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Claude Walker talking about the layout of Hikuku wetlands and changes he has noticed over the past decade.

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Hiruharama students identifying aquatic life to assess habitat status and water quality.

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A six hour walk over the sacred maunga Kokai above Whareponga identified a number of areas requiring protection and removal of exotic plants.

 

 

Tieki Te Taiao o Te Takiwa – Environmental protection and restoration – Pānui 1

9 Pepuere 2015
Nga mihi o te wa ki a koe, koutou ko tou whanau

RE: Tieki Te Taiao o Te Takiwa – Environmental protection and restoration

Hikurangi Takiwa Trust (HTT) is a charitable trust supporting a collective of hapū Te Aitanga a Mate, Te Aowera and Te Whānau a Rakairoa. These hapu are affiliated to lands of the tributaries of the Mata River including Whakapaurangi, Hiruharama, Makarika, bound by Hikurangi inland and Whareponga at the coast. 10150654702126273

We are keen to support local landowners, lessees, whanau and marae with environmental protection initiatives to restore natural habitat, protect flora and fauna and improve biodiversity. We can support your conservation efforts through:
1. Developing a comprehensive assessment of the health of the land, water and biodiversity within our takiwa
2. Sharing and training tools and resources that support sustainable land & water management
3. Facilitating and coordinating technical and scientific expertise
4. Enabling habitat restoration through site and resource specific plans and seed collection and propogation to support eco-sourced replanting of sites
5. Some financial support for costs associated with conservation and restoration activities.
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A range of events including hapū wānanga and community workshops will be convened to facilitate this kaupapa. A ‘State of the Takiwa” report will be produced identifying priority sites for restoration by October 2015. Protection and restoration action is the key focus from November 2015 onwards.

This project is supported by the Conservation Community Partnership Fund through Te Papa Atawhai (DOC) and their staff, Gisborne District Council, Nga Whenua Rahui, local experts and scientists and our local schools/ education providers.

If you would like to find out more please contact Pia Pohatu at pmcpohatu@gmail.com. 06 8648667 or 021 653341. You can also check out www.hikurangi.wordpress.com.

Naku noa na,
Pia Pohatu.
Trustee & Project Manager