Iti te Kōpara – Hapū Economic Development Plan

Iti te kopara kai takiri ana i runga i te Kahikatea.

Hikurangi Takiwa Trust (HTT) with support from Eastland Community Trust (ECT), commissioned the preparation of a draft Economic Development Plan to help identify opportunities and plan action to raise the economic wellbeing of the Takiwa.

Scope

HTT Trustees agreed at their meeting in March 2016 that it made sense for the plan to include people and places in the wider district and not be restricted just to the geographic and population communities that Hikurangi Takiwa Trust is established to benefit. This plan has a focus on the area generally from Te Puia Springs and Waipiro Bay through to Poroporo and Rangitukia.

It is by no means comprehensive or authoritative, it has no explicit mandate from the people in this district but we have tried to involve business owners and local residents in identifying priorities and opportunities to progress. We have provided drafts of the plan to a number of external stakeholders with a particular interest in our communities.

Structure

Through a process of local stakeholder engagement and research, a broad range of opportunities have been narrowed down in the development of an Action Plan to ensure limited resources can make the greatest short to medium term difference.

The projects in the Action Plan have been organised together into three broad work streams:

  • WHAIRAWA / CAPITAL GROWTH
  • AHUWHENUA / ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT
  • KUHUKUHU / SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOODS

 

The Whairawa / Capital Growth work-stream focuses on identifying and growing six asset classes in the district:

  • Natural Capital: Regenerating a healthy natural environment.
  • Manufactured Capital: Ensuring the infrastructure that enables economic development and wellbeing is available.
  • Human Capital: Building local capability for economic development through education, training, mentoring and whānau relocating back to the district.
  • Intellectual Capital: Developing and protecting knowledge-based assets including traditional knowledge and intellectual property.
  • Financial Capital: Encouraging capital investment in local ventures.
  • Social & Cultural Capital: Maintaining and growing healthy relationships, traditions, creativity and resources within the community.

The Ahuwhenua / Enterprise Development work-stream focuses on supporting the local development of high value industries and the business service sector. This includes new products and services and expanding existing enterprises while reducing associated business costs:

  • Tourism & Hospitality: eco-tourism, cultural experiences, agricultural tourism, etc.
  • Bioactives: manuka, kanuka, hemp, pine, etc.
  • Energy: solar, hydro and biomass for heating, fuel and electricity
  • Research & Technology: online businesses and services, consultants and technical support, etc.
  • Forestry: diversifying species, improving environmental management, utilising waste stream, etc.
  • Beef & Sheep: diversifying breeds and improving production
  • Horticulture: cropping, nuts, truffles, saffron, Nati Kai Kete, etc.

The Kuhukuhu / Sustainable Livelihoods work-stream focuses on supporting whānau to stay in the district, maintain sustainable lifestyles based on traditional whenua and access to natural resources through:

  • Supporting Existing Businesses: identifying & deploying priority business support for existing enterprise;
  • Reframing Development: using progress indicators that measure wellbeing instead of income;
  • Supporting Subsistence: enabling public policy supporting rather than penalising subsistence lifestyles based on hunting, gathering and harvesting;
  • Digital Development: improving digital infrastructure and skills for telecommuting.

Next Steps

To progress the goals of the plan Hikurangi Takiwa Trust supports the establishment of a new entity to lead job creation and economic development opportunities in the takiwa and neighbouring hapū. Subsequently this planning process has resulted in the establishment of Hikurangi Huataukina Trust, a charitable trust focused on job creation and economic development – initially in the communities between Waipiro Bay and Rangitukia.

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Vision Matauranga support for hapū

New funds have been allocated to support the co-management of freshwater in Tairawhiti. Hapū collective, Hikurangi Takiwā Trust, will host a two year placement of freshwater scientist, Dr Joanne Clapcott, from the Cawthron Institute, New Zealand’s largest independent science organisation.

The placement will be funded by the Te Punaha Hihiko – Vision Matauranga Capability Fund from the Ministry for Business Innovation & Employment. This is the fourth round for the Fund which was established to grow skills and capacity for Māori participation in science and innovation and support outcomes that benefit New Zealand.

The placement will help discover and develop local capability through the design and application of a cultural monitoring framework for freshwater resources.

“The cultural monitoring framework provides the backbone of the placement from which we hope to develop new tools for local hapū and landowners to engage in freshwater management” says Dr Clapcott.

Proposed new ‘tools’ include:

  • a locally relevant cultural health indicator
  • a monitoring network that identifies and incorporates the values of local hapū
  • a five year regional engagement plan that promotes co-learning amongst neighbouring hapū collectives with parallel aspirations to increase their freshwater management capability.

Hikurangi Takiwā Trust has strong kaitiakitanga aspirations and a desire to engage in the co-management of freshwater in the Waiapu rohe. Following the ratification of the Joint Management Agreement between Te Runanga o Ngāti Porou and Gisborne District Council in 2015, Hikurangi Takiwā Trust have been identifying ways to actively engage in the co-management of environmental resources in the Waiapu catchment.

“Hikurangi Takiwā Trust are stoked to host and work alongside Dr Joanne Clapcott – who has affiliations to local hapū Te Aitanga a Mate – in her placement and build our freshwater skill set” says Trustee Pia Pohatu.

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Meanwhile, Hikurangi Takiwā Trust has teamed up with He Awa Ora, He Tai Ora, Healthy Rivers Living Sea Education Trust to offer a two day training workshop this week on stream and river quality monitoring.

The workshop for hapū members, marae representatives, local landowners, teachers and students is on 27th and 28th June at Kariaka Pa, Ruatoria.

For more information and to register please contact Pia Pohatu: pia@uritukuiho.org.nz

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Hikurangi Takiwa Trust is a hapū collective progressing the interests and responsibilities of Te Aitanga-a-Mate, Te Aowera, Te Whānau-a-Rākairoa, Te Whānau-a-Hinekehu and Te Awemapara hapū located between Waipiro Bay and Ruatorea.

Freshwater Monitoring Workshop

Hikurangi Takiwa Trust has teamed up with He Awa Ora, He Tai Ora, Healthy Rivers Living Sea Education Trust to offer a two day training workshop on stream and river quality monitoring. 

The free workshop will cover a wide range of low cost, user-friendly tools and scientifically robust techniques for assessing the quality and changes in waterways in Tairāwhiti. The workshop will be based in the Waikohu and Makatote streams that feed into the awa Mata. Cultural considerations and Health & Safety issues will also be covered in the workshop.

Accommodation is available and we encourage participation from hapu members, marae representatives, local landowners, teachers and students.

The workshop will start 10am Monday 27 June at Kariaka Pa, Ruatoria and conclude 3pm 28 June.

For more information and to register please contact Pia Pohatu: pia@uritukuiho.org.nz 

East Coast Digital Development Hui

Freshly installed Horehore / Makarika - Ruatoria radio wifi repeater owned by Evolution Wireless.

Freshly installed Horehore / Makarika – Ruatoria radio wifi repeater owned by Evolution Wireless.

A hui hosted by Hikurangi Takiwa Trust was held at Kariaka Pa on 31 August 2015 to identify priority digital developments for our part of the world. With representatives at the hui from Te Araroa to Te Puia, the meeting notes were circulated to a wider group of East Coast residents for additional input.

Those involved agreed on the following:

Community Technology & Tourism Hubs

  • Community Technology Hubs provide valuable opportunities for local residents who do not have internet access at home to have a relatively easy access option, with support to develop their confidence and skills.
  • Community Technology Hubs provide people with opportunities to better understand the potential of internet access to make their lives easier – particularly in terms of communication with family, friends, businesses (especially banking, utilities and other services) and public services (Council, health services, WINZ, IRD, etc.).
  • Community Technology Hubs can also be used as tourist visitor centres with information on local attractions, accommodation, food retailers.
  • A number of existing facilities and groups exist in the villages[1] on the Coast that are already or could be utilised as Community Technology Hubs. What we need is a feasibility assessment for each community to:
    1. identify the most promising facilities in each community;
    2. a building report on what the facility already has and would need to be suitable as a Community Technology Hub (insulation, networking, internet connection, work stations, furniture, kitchen facilities, toilets, etc.);
    3. identify the potential host organisation that is already or could support one or more part-time staff members to provide training and support to users, and visitor information services.

Such a study would also look at shared services that could be offered between the hubs (such as a common server, software licenses, specialist equipment, specialist technicians and trainers, etc.)

Roadshow

  • Information contained in the GDC submission to MBIE for the digital enablement EOI was inaccurate and misrepresented the reality of the situation for households, service providers and businesses on the East Coast. It needs to be corrected as it formed the basis for the bid and significantly over-claimed existing coverage.
  • A significant barrier to more affordable internet access is lack of knowledge about what services are available for what price.
  • A roadshow around Coast communities – probably through school and marae – could provide independent advice and information on options for home and business internet access (including ISPs products, phone/internet boosters, etc.), as well as engaging communities in discussions on digital development priorities and consultation to identify current blackspots in radio WiFi and cellular coverage.

Other barriers

  • Significant costs are associated with establishing a new connection on the Coast because new physical infrastructure is often required in the form of a radio repeater – these usually cost $2-3,000 per repeater. To reduce the digital divide, residents should pay the same for establishing and maintaining internet connections regardless of where they live in the region. Subsidies for new rural broadband connections would reduce the current disparities that mean those in the highest deprivation areas pay the highest costs to access the internet.
  • The Mind Lab is difficult to access from the Coast – both in terms of travel distance and cost for holiday programmes, etc. Is it serving the district equally? If not, what will be done to reduce the inequalities in access to this important and heavily subsidised resource for students, teachers and whānau?
  • Access to technical support is more costly for the Coast because technicians servicing private homes, businesses, education and health providers and community services have to pay extra for travel time and mileage to have their machines serviced. How can we support technical support closer to where it is required if the critical mass does not yet exist?
  • There are mixed messages about how much the fibre running around the Coast can be utilised by communities and facilities. We need accurate information on the possibilities and opportunities to utilise this vital piece of infrastructure for businesses, health and education providers and homes – especially those in close proximity to SH35 and the fibre cable installed by FX Networks.

Other opportunities

  • Significant opportunities exist for cultural and business development if more investment is made in things like Code Clubs, Te Reo resources, basic technology skills, telehealth services, bee-keeping technologies, etc.
  • The pilot project Ivan Lomax has undertaken with Tolaga Bay Area School to utilise their high speed connection for homes in the vicinity and sending data via a repeater on Titirangi has a lot of potential and Ministry of Education has explicitly encouraged schools to use their connections for community benefit. This need more support and a project focused on the potential for this solution to be implemented around the region.

If readers have other suggestions, please comment in the box below…

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[1] Hicks Bay, Te Araroa, Tikitiki/Rangitukia, Ruatorea, Waipiro/Te Puia Spring, Tokomaru Bay, Tolaga Bay.

TRONPnui candidate responses to hapu questionnaire

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Hikuranga Takiwa Trust is an entity representing the six pa of Te Whanau a Hinekehu, Te Aowera, Te Aitanga-a-Mate and Te Whanau-a-Rakairoa in Rohenga 5. Whanau in our rohenga affiliate to all the other TRONPnui rohenga as well, so we sent this candidate questionnaire to all TRONPnui candidates to allow us to share the responses within our hapu and Ngati Porou whanui.

It was entirely optional for candidates to participate and some have not provided responses. Thanks to those (in red) who have responded, the answers are thoughtful and many are comprehensive. Feel free to leave comments below if you have feedback on the questions and/or answers. If other candidates submit responses, we will upload them, so please check back before you vote.

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A number of hapu clusters / rohenga are planning meet the candidates meetings. Hikurangi Takiwa Trust have invited Rohenga 5 candidates to our six-weekly hui this Sunday 13th September and we’ve included time for the candidates to speak to the hui and take patai from the floor.

Voting papers will be posted from Monday 14 September 2015. Voting will close at 12pm noon on Wednesday 14 October 2015. More information about the election is available at: www.ngatiporou.com

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Rohenga Tipuna 1 – Potikirua ki Whangaokeno

KARAITIANA Tina (Kei Te Whenua)
KOHERE Rei (Noho Kaenga)
PAHURU-HURIWAI Ani (Noho Kaenga)
PUKETAPU-WATSON Huti (Noho Kaenga)

Rohenga Tipuna 2 – Whangaokeno ki Waiapu

GOLDSMITH Keryn (Kei Te Whenua)
GOLDSMITH Victor (Kei Te Whenua)
HIRSCHFELD Charl (Kei Te Whenua)
IRWIN Kathie (Kei Te Whenua)
MAHUIKA Matanuku (Noho Kaenga)
PAPUNI April (Noho Kaenga)
TANGAERE Patrick (Noho Kaenga)
TIBBLE Tiwana (Kei Te Whenua)

Rohenga Tipuna 3 – Pohautea ki Te Onepoto

TANGAERE BALDWIN Lilian (Noho Kaenga)
TAWHIWHIRANGI Heni (Noho Kaenga)
WALKER Ngarangi (Noho Kaenga)

Rohenga Tipuna 4 – Te Onepoto ki Rahuimanuka

HEI HEI Michael (Kei Te Whenua)
PHILIP-BARBARA Glenis Hiria (Kei Te Whenua)
REEDY-TAARE Mei (Kei Te Whenua)
WALKER Lionel (Kei Te Whenua)
WARMENHOVEN Marijke (Noho Kaenga)
WARMENHOVEN Tui Aroha (Noho Kaenga)

Rohenga Tipuna 5 – Rahuimanuka ki Mataahu

KUPENGA Te Rau (Kei Te Whenua)
NGARIMU Elizabeth (Noho Kaenga)
PARATA Selwyn (Noho Kaenga)
SOUTAR Barry James (Kei Te Whenua)
TUHURA Kuini Moehau (Noho Kaenga)

Rohenga Tipuna 6 – Mataahu ki Kokoronui

CHAMBERS Jack (Noho Kaenga)
KALE Fiona (Kei Te Whenua)
PEWHAIRANGI Kody (Noho Kaenga)
RAIHANIA Na (Kei Te Whenua)
TIBBLE Rhonda Maxine (Kei Te Whenua)
WHAREHINGA Josh (Noho Kaenga)

Rohenga Tipuna 7 – Kokoronui ki Te Toka a Taiau

BLACKMAN Kelly (Noho Kaenga)
GIBSON Harata (Charlotte) (Noho Kaenga)
OLSEN-RATANA Tina (Kei Te Whenua)
TANGOHAU Maui (Noho Kaenga)
TE MOMO Fiona (Kei Te Whenua)
TUHIWAI-RURU Rawiri (Kei Te Whenua)

East Coast Digital Development Hui

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Hikurangi Takiwa Trust is hosting a hui 10.30am-12pm on Monday 31st August at Kariaka Pa for East Coast residents and businesses to discuss digital capability development opportunities for the whole Coast and our specific communities.

Gisborne District Council is preparing a Digital Enablement Plan (“DEP”) to submit to central government by mid-September. Community input on the DEP will start on Tuesday 25th August, Hikurangi Takiwa Trust is keen to ensure Coast communities knowledge and priorities help shape the DEP.

The Gisborne Regional Digital Strategy will build on the good work done as part of Gisborne’s Gigatown project which had significant community support. The Strategy will cover Leadership, Community, Business, Environment and will seek to address three key issues: Affordability, Accessibility and Digital Literacy.

Central government continues to send a clear message that broadband access is a priority for New Zealand. At end of March, government announced its commitment to building world leading internet speeds to more of our population. There is to be an increase in funding for three programmes:

  • Ultra Fast Broadband 2 (“UFB2”) extension: aims to roll out fibre to 80% of NZers in urban areas – funding increase of $210m;
  • Rural Broadband 2 (“RBI2”) extension: aims to provide upgraded broadband services in rural areas – funding increase of $100m;
  • Mobile ‘black spots’ (MBSF)’: aims to increase mobile services to tourist areas and priority areas on State Highways – funding of $50m.

Government is looking to invest in areas where deployment will be relatively cost-effective, where uptake can be demonstrated to be high and where broadband services are unavailable (defined as less than 5Mbps). Council, with the support of key stakeholders, has completed the first stage of a submission for improving our digital infrastructure – a Registration of Interest – Support. Stage two of the process is to complete a Digital Enablement Plan (“DEP”). The DEP will outline the benefits of the programme funding for Tairāwhiti and how we will activate uptake.

The DEP is due 12pm, 16 September. The Regional Digital Strategy will be our DEP.

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Regardless of the success or otherwise of the bid for government funding, the Digital Strategy will guide our digital future by setting some key priorities for action. It will refine the Gigatown Plan for Success.

It may be useful to think about the three capability development layers used in the Plan: Infrastructure, Services & People – what should these look like for the Coast?

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Hapū aiming for habitat protection through sustainable land use

With a national report just released showing 74 per cent of native freshwater species are threatened and the relaxing of plantation forestry rules set to cause more erosion, a hapu collective on the East Coast plans to enhance natural habitat while ensuring families based on the land can make a living.

Hapu ‘kaitieki’ on top of Tutae-a-Whata near Makarika.

Hapu ‘kaitieki’ on top of Tutae-a-Whata near Makarika.

The third Hikurangi Takiwa Trust hapu wananga of the Tieki Te Taiao o Te Takiwa project was held at Penu Pa near Makarika over the weekend.

Wananga activities included measuring water quality and stream habitat, assessing the impact of soil erosion on land use and waterways, restoring native vegetation and the looking at the environmental impacts of various land uses including farming, forestry and residential settlement.

Sharing stream survey tools and techniques in-situ of the Makatote Stream with students from Te Kura o Makarika, Te Kura o Hiruharama, Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Te Waiu and Te Parekereke Mokopuna o Hiruharama was the highlight on the first day facilitated by Murray Palmer, Amy-Rose Hardy and Dr Joanne Clapcott, a freshwater scientist with the Cawthron Institute in Nelson.

The Rapid Habitat Assessment (RHA) is a tool developed by Dr Clapcott for stream habitat assessment. It provides a straightforward way for assessors to score and areas that don’t score so well provide a clear focus for restoration efforts.

Dr Joanne Clapcott from the Cawthron Institute identifying stream inhabitants with wananga participants from Makarika and Hiruharama.

Dr Joanne Clapcott from the Cawthron Institute identifying stream inhabitants with wananga participants from Makarika and Hiruharama.

Wananga participants focused on a monitoring site in the Makatote Stream just below Penu Pa. With an RHA score of 72/100, areas for habitat improvement were readily identified as riparian shade, and adjacent and upstream erosion.

The macroinvertebrate community (stream bugs) index score for the same site was 116.4, just below the threshold for ‘Excellent – clean water’.

“This is especially good for a farm-type stream as we took samples from a range of habitats” said Mr Palmer, who has been monitoring waterways around the district for more than thirty years. “Nearly half of the animals gathered were of the sensitive orders, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera, again a very good result.”

Matauranga a hapu was a highlight of the weekend with whakapapa expert Karen Pewhairangi facilitating a role-play with participants of local historical events involving tipuna Te Atau. Nga Kuri Paaka a Uetuhiao, Te Rangitawaea and Kirimamae and their children Rongoitekai, Rongohaere and Wi o Te Rangi.

“We orient ourselves through our shared whakapapa and stories” said project coordinator and local land owner Pia Pohatu. “Our cultural landscape helps us make sense of what is happening in today’s physical landscape and ways we can lead and support current-day landowners and decision-makers with restoration aspirations.”

Regenerating kahikatea, totara and rewarewa at Pouturu Station, Ihungia.

Regenerating kahikatea, totara and rewarewa at Pouturu Station, Ihungia.

Advancing an integrated environmental monitoring program for te rohenga o Hikurangi Takiwa was a major milestone for the Trust, that works for the six pa and associated hapu in the area between Mt Hikurangi, Waipiro Bay and Ruatoria.

“We are grateful for the expertise and participation of scientists like Murray, Joanne and Dr Ian Ruru” said Ms Pohatu.

Weta at Waingakia Station.

Weta at Waingakia Station.

The monitoring program will integrate three key water quality measuring tools – the Mauri Compass developed by Dr Ruru and endorsed by Gisborne District Council, the Rapid Habitat Assessment developed by Dr Clapcott and the Cawthron Institute, and the Macroinvertebrate Community Index endorsed by the Ministry for the Environment. A digital monitoring tool with an interactive ‘touch-smart’ and GIS mapping platform is being developed as a user interface for the monitoring data collected.

Wananga participants included a number of local land owners, farmers and young people.

“We are really looking to achieve a sustainable model of co-existence between humans and other species” said participant Manu Caddie. “As Wendell Berry says, the question we must deal with is not whether the domestic and the wild are separate or can be separated; it is how, in the human economy, their indissoluble and necessary connection can be properly maintained. What kind of plantation forestry or hill country farming is helpful to protect remaining wildlife while still enabling locals to earn a living? And where will our food and construction materials come from if we didn’t have farming or forestry?”

Amy-Rose Hardy instructing wananga participants on the process for gathering macroinvertebrate from the Makatote Stream.

Amy-Rose Hardy instructing wananga participants on the process for gathering macroinvertebrate from the Makatote Stream.

Participants spent the evenings adding sites to a growing digital database and GIS map for Hikurangi Takiwa using online services to source information that was integrated with local cultural knowledge.

“GIS is a powerful and accessible tool for recording and re-presenting matauranga (cultural knowledge) that is important to us, supports lifelong learning and our aspirations, needs and responsibilities as kaitiaki” said Ms Pohatu.

“The ability to collaboratively build and share maps supports intergenerational transmission of matauranga, improves our decision-making and better informs the initiatives we want to lead and get involved with.”

A Ngati Porou Wai Maori Hui was held at the conclusion of the wananga with presentations by Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou representatives and Gisborne District Council staff.

Penu Pa is one of 30 marae that has access to Nati Waiwhai, a free internet service established by Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou and local ISP Gisborne.Net.

“Internet access is essential for this kind of event” said Penu Pa committee member Natasha Koia. “So we are grateful to the individuals and organisations that have made WiFi accessible to most marae on the East Coast.”

The wananga was supported by the Department of Conservation Community Conservation Partnership Fund, Gisborne District Council and the Cawthron Institute.

Collecting macroinvertebrate from the Makatote Stream.

Collecting macroinvertebrate from the Makatote Stream.

 

Wananga participants agreed on the need to develop waterway monitoring program to assess the quality of streams and rivers before, during and after plantation forest harvesting within the hapu estate.

Wananga participants agreed on the need to develop a waterway monitoring program to assess the quality of streams and rivers before, during and after plantation forest harvesting within the hapu estate.